Beeswax competition

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I'm hoping for some guidance for presentation of beeswax for judging. It is to be " a 500 gram block". Is there a rule for how exact that weight needs to be and is there any guidance as to the shape /depth of the block? If there are no rules, what is considered the best way of presentation, dimensions and so on?
Thanks!
 

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I'm hoping for some guidance for presentation of beeswax for judging. It is to be " a 500 gram block". Is there a rule for how exact that weight needs to be and is there any guidance as to the shape /depth of the block? If there are no rules, what is considered the best way of presentation, dimensions and so on?
Thanks!
Think it depends on what the show guide says. If all it says is a 500g block sounds weight is the only criteria. Most I’ve seen and had a go at doing have been made in shallow Pyrex round or oblong dishes. Here’s one I got a second for with others alongside in our local show
 

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10.8 the presence of any notifiable disease will disqualify the exhibit
Given that varroa is now notifiable I assume that's just made the "Observation Hives and Nucleus Hives" class a lot harder!
No. Varroa is now reportable, not notifiable.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Given that varroa is now notifiable I assume that's just made the "Observation Hives and Nucleus Hives" class a lot harder!
No, because it's not - it's reportable, totally different
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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I see in this document it shouldn't be more than 1.5 inches thick.


I wonder what the rationale is for that?
Different competitions have different rules - nothing more than that - it's a test of the exhibitor's skills so it's not meant to be 'easy' .By restricting weight and thickness it strives to allow a more level playing field, some find a smaller area mould needing more wax is easier to get just right, some will say the need for more wax means more cleaning, whilst with a smaller quantity it's easier to obtain a quantity of really high quality lighter coloured wax. by restricting the height of the cake it makes people can't use smaller deeper moulds.
Remember that the bottom surface of the cake gets juudged as well as the visible surfaces - that's the area which is the top of the cake whilst being cast - its must be smooth with no ripples and the surface area and thickness of the cake can have an influence in that.
at one time they used to change the dimensions/weights required of the wax cake exhibits to try and discourage some from putting in the same 'prize winning' cake of wax year after year.
I'm thinking perhaps of using a square baking tray / cake tin?
Oven proof glass is better - Pyrex for example, but not the modern ones as they are embossed on the inside!
The longer it takes to cool the less chance of the wax rippling, you can hear the bowl up (including the lid - that is crucial) then cover the whole thing with old towels/a fleece whatever and leave them cool overnight.
also, wax weighs the same as water so you can put the bowl on a scales and pour the desired weight of water in so you can measure to check the thickness of the cake and mark the outside as a guide when pouring. Just remember that wax will shrink when cooled so you need to pour a few more millimetres of hot wax in
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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I wonder whether it is so that they can hold it up to a/ the light to check consistency / for impurities???? Much thicker and the light won’t come through( actually I don’t know if the light will be visible at an inch and a half)! Anyone know?
yes - it doesn't
 

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jenkinsbrynmair 

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I'm hoping for some guidance for presentation of beeswax for judging.
Only use fresh clean wax - don't make the same mistake most make by using 'recycled' comb burr comb, scrapings from inspections etc - I've seen some awful grey and brown wax exhibits being entered before now, even at the 'National' Honey Show. Just use virgin cappings wax, even better if the honeycomb you got the cappings off is newly drawn stuff. Wash it well and pick out any dark or suspect bits, then dry it before melting down in a bain marie but remember never let it get to much more than about 70°C. First filter through a piece of double thichness stocking stretched over a bean tin with both ends removed and held in place with a rubber band, then further filterings should be done through a piece of surgical lint (fluffy side to the inside of the can)
 

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Only use fresh clean wax - don't make the same mistake most make by using 'recycled' comb burr comb, scrapings from inspections etc - I've seen some awful grey and brown wax exhibits being entered before now, even at the 'National' Honey Show. Just use virgin cappings wax, even better if the honeycomb you got the cappings off is newly drawn stuff. Wash it well and pick out any dark or suspect bits, then dry it before melting down in a bain marie but remember never let it get to much more than about 70°C. First filter through a piece of double thichness stocking stretched over a bean tin with both ends removed and held in place with a rubber band, then further filterings should be done through a piece of surgical lint (fluffy side to the inside of the can)
Excellent.

Thank you.
 

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I had a go, and I"ll have to do it again obviously, but this is what happened part way through cooling. It's like it stuck to one side. It was cooling very slowly. Should I put something on the inside of the glass perhaps?
 

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jenkinsbrynmair 

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looks like it cooled too quickly, I leave mine at least 12 hours before uncovering and then never try and force the wax out of the mould. You wait until the wax is totally cooled then put the whole lot (mould and all) in a deep bowl of cold water then wait until the wax floats to the surface (can take 24 hours).
the thicker the block the more chance of it cracking
The quicker it cools the same issues
Heat up the mould and lid in the over for five minutes or so before pouring the wax then cover and insulate and leave overnight without moving
if you are worried about the wax sticking, either buy some silicone spray and give just a light spraying - or, put a spot of washing up liquid on your finger and rub into the mould with small circular motions until the glass looks clear again.
 

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looks like it cooled too quickly, I leave mine at least 12 hours before uncovering and then never try and force the wax out of the mould. You wait until the wax is totally cooled then put the whole lot (mould and all) in a deep bowl of cold water then wait until the wax floats to the surface (can take 24 hours).
the thicker the block the more chance of it cracking
The quicker it cools the same issues
Heat up the mould and lid in the over for five minutes or so before pouring the wax then cover and insulate and leave overnight without moving
if you are worried about the wax sticking, either buy some silicone spray and give just a light spraying - or, put a spot of washing up liquid on your finger and rub into the mould with small circular motions until the glass looks clear again.
Fab. Thanks!
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Looks good - you can get rid of the rough edges on the underside by rubbing your (clean) thumb over it.
 

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