BBC - Queen of The Savannah

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

RoofTops 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jun 20, 2009
Messages
2,428
Reaction score
1
Location
Kingsbridge, South Devon
Hive Type
none
Number of Hives
0 - Now in beeless retirement!
For those who didn't see it yesterday the programme about African honey bees is on iPlayer. http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01f875l/Natural_World_20112012_Queen_of_the_Savannah/

The best honey bee video photography I have ever seen and apart from a few anthropomorphisms a very good programme.

Interesting to wonder how the bees learned to migrate. There is a theory birds learned through continental drift - as the continents drifted apart they simply flew further. Perhaps the African honey bees did something simliar and remembered as the climate warmed where to find forage in the dry season. Flying further and further back to the highlands as they expanded across the savannah.

Also interesting to speculate if or whether European races might also try to migrate when stressed. It would be one explanation for Mary Celeste syndrome - they have gone on their holidays.
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,523
Reaction score
29
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
In sri lanka Apis dorsata and Apis cerana both migrate and Apis dorsata returns to the same nest site or same tree each year

now work that out....no worker memory of the site
 

rockdoc 

Field Bee
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
594
Reaction score
0
Location
East Devon a bit of a green desert!
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
10
where's the drone?

I agree, great photography, although I thought the fudge over mating was a bit off. People who do not know could be forgiven for thinking the queen comes out ready to lay!
 

Monsieur Abeille 

Queen Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2010
Messages
2,984
Reaction score
3
Location
Exmoor
Hive Type
none
Number of Hives
None of my own
One thing though - the program states that the queen is the only bee able to sting more than once - is this the case?

I'd always assumed that (for AMM to least) workers could sting more than once, unless their target had nasty tight skin that kept hold of the stinger - e.g. stinging other bees OK, humans less so.
 

Russel 

Field Bee
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
959
Reaction score
0
Location
Panteg, Gwent
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
7 + 3 nuc
In sri lanka Apis dorsata and Apis cerana both migrate and Apis dorsata returns to the same nest site or same tree each year

now work that out....no worker memory of the site
Bit OT but the Monarch butterfly migration is another example. They travel 2500mls, 4 generations during trip and use the same nest sites the following year????

First shown in 2012 appears to have taken BBKA 3 yrs to mention the bee crop defence in latest mag.;)

More from B'b Here
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top