Quantcast

Asian Hornet

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

La Folie 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
102
Reaction score
0
Location
Shropshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
4
Went to a presentation on the Asian Hornet given by a Seasonal Inspector, who had, in turn been briefed by the NBU. It included an interesting - indeed horrifying - video of AHs hawking outside a hive. Given the rate of expansion in France and into the rest of Europe, if the AH is not here yet it soon will be. We need to be prepared and get traps up now (design on the NBU site).

Given the impact in France I almost felt like selling off my hives now!
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2015
Messages
734
Reaction score
1
Location
Louth, Ireland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
9
They truly are frightening - this video on youtube shows how 30 hornets killed off 30000 bees - youtube.com/watch?v=EZ1eAM8CChc
 

Hivemaker. 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
14,310
Reaction score
9
Location
Exmoor.
Hive Type
national
It included an interesting - indeed horrifying - video of AHs hawking outside a hive.
The European hornets spend a fair bit of their time bee catching and dismembering them around the hives.

They truly are frightening - this video on youtube shows how 30 hornets killed off 30000 bees - youtube.com/watch?v=EZ1eAM8CChc
Good job they have not made it to Europe or here yet.
 

theeggman 

Drone Bee
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
1,201
Reaction score
3
Location
Okehampton,Devon
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
2 Cedar + 5 Poly
The European hornets spend a fair bit of their time bee catching and dismembering them around the hives.



Good job they have not made it to Europe or here yet.

That's being naughty Pete, amusing though.:leaving:
 

Kevin Cowle 

New Bee
Joined
Feb 24, 2015
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
France
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
1
I've been keeping bees in the south of France (Pyrenees) for 5 years and two years ago the Asian Hornets arrived at my hives. It is quite appalling to see them take a bee on the wing and then HEAR it dismember the bee on a nearby branch of a tree. However I found two ways to deal with them (1) buy a fly swat, hit the hornets to the ground and stamp on them (best to wear full kit whilst doing this as the sting is hospital-worthy) (2) plant lots of sticks and twigs in the ground about two feet high over a three foot radius of the hive entrance. AH are not very maneuverable and cannot navigate through the twigs, though the bees can and dive into the hive entrance quickly. I think chicken netting might work as well, bot not if there are hundreds of AHs attacking. These hornets have migrated 500 miles across France in 5 years, so it's only a matter of time before they cross the Channel.
 

Hivemaker. 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
14,310
Reaction score
9
Location
Exmoor.
Hive Type
national
It is quite appalling to see them take a bee on the wing and then HEAR it dismember the bee on a nearby branch of a tree.
Quite a sight, seen it many times here, every year, with the European hornets doing just the same, have taken several pictures of them over the years and put them on this, and the old BBKA forum.

Vespa mandarinia japonica, as in the earlier video, not in Europe.

Vespa velutina, which is now in Europe.
 
Last edited:

Torq 

Field Bee
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Messages
503
Reaction score
0
Location
Athlone. Co. Westmeath. Ireland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
4 Hives, 4 Nucs.
Every time Asian hornets are mentioned I pose the possibility that they may never cross the channel for the same reason that the European hornet has not fully colonised the UK and that we don't have any hornets in Ireland.

But what that reason is, I don't know.
 

Chiangmai member 

New Bee
Joined
May 30, 2012
Messages
61
Reaction score
0
Location
Chiangmai, Thailand
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
5

Hivemaker. 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
14,310
Reaction score
9
Location
Exmoor.
Hive Type
national
Please do not confuse this Asian hornet with Vespa mandarinia japonica the stars of the Japanese videos, which kill 30,000 bees in 2 minutes or something. There are no reports of this one invading Europe.
As already pointed out in post eight.
 

Torq 

Field Bee
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Messages
503
Reaction score
0
Location
Athlone. Co. Westmeath. Ireland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
4 Hives, 4 Nucs.
Maybe the Asian hornets will stick to the same range as the European hornet.



There's a massive amount of trade and movement between the UK and Ireland yet the European Hornet has not made it here, why not??
 

MJBee 

Drone Bee
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
0
Location
Dordogne 24360 France
Hive Type
commercial
Number of Hives
16 a mix of Commercial, National, 14 x 12, Dadant and a Warre
Here in the Dordogne we have been living with the Asian Hornet for more than 5 years and quite frankly it is not living up to it's hype.

They are smaller than the European hornet and a not aggressive UNLESS you interfere with their nest

I have not experienced "mob handed" attacks only singles hunting from under the hive.

There are numerous designs for traps. If the traps are deployed in early March and kept fresh and attractive until the end of May most of the victims are Queen hornets = 1 less nest of 40,000 by August per queen.

Don't get the underwear in a twist folks, if/when they arrive in the UK they can be dealt with just like varroa.
 

La Folie 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
102
Reaction score
0
Location
Shropshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
4
Don't get the underwear in a twist folks, if/when they arrive in the UK they can be dealt with just like varroa.[/QUOTE]

Given the lengths beekeepers have had to go to combat varroa I am not at all sure that the quote is reassuring. However, its fight or give up so here we go again.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
11,589
Reaction score
1,476
Location
Fareham, Hampshire UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
They've been on their way here for a while and I'm in the front line in the Costa del Fareham .. only 70 miles as the hornet flies from France .. and with enough cross channel ferries and lorries going to and fro to maintain several armies ..

There was a very good thread in 2012 which is worth a read:

http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=17229

and there is an excellent piece on beebase (I have it downloaded and I can't find the direct link) but here's a google link to it which will let you open the pdf version - another good read and for those on the front line plans for a Fera DIY hornet trap.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...KpANqKjtAnvQ3rSVKSu1ivg&bvm=bv.87269000,d.d24
 

nikca 

House Bee
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
118
Reaction score
0
Location
Dordogne
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3 increasing
Every time Asian hornets are mentioned I pose the possibility that they may never cross the channel for the same reason that the European hornet has not fully colonised the UK and that we don't have any hornets in Ireland.

But what that reason is, I don't know.
St Patrick? :icon_204-2:

They are indeed little buggers, but not the end of the beekeeping world. When the leaves dropped this year I found I had an Vespa Velutina nest 50m from my hives, next to my own middle lake. Neither I not the visiting fishermen had noticed it all year.

It does explain why I had a day standing in front of the hives in September with the badminton racket. After dispatching about 50 backhand (and about 5 European forehand) the visits stopped. It seems they work like bees and go back and bring their friends... I doubt 50 mas much of the nest (it was about 1m tall) but it stopped the visitations.

Best get some traps out.
 

BILL.HEARD 

House Bee
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Messages
460
Reaction score
0
Location
TEIGNMOUTH
Hive Type
commercial
Here in the Dordogne we have been living with the Asian Hornet for more than 5 years and quite frankly it is not living up to it's hype.

They are smaller than the European hornet and a not aggressive UNLESS you interfere with their nest

I have not experienced "mob handed" attacks only singles hunting from under the hive.

There are numerous designs for traps. If the traps are deployed in early March and kept fresh and attractive until the end of May most of the victims are Queen hornets = 1 less nest of 40,000 by August per queen.

Don't get the underwear in a twist folks, if/when they arrive in the UK they can be dealt with just like varroa.
Yes dusting them with icing sugar should see them off!!!
 

BrianO 

Joined
Sep 27, 2012
Messages
1,248
Reaction score
0
Location
Dublin ( South )
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
40 Plus
Every time Asian hornets are mentioned I pose the possibility that they may never cross the channel for the same reason that the European hornet has not fully colonised the UK and that we don't have any hornets in Ireland.

But what that reason is, I don't know.
Ehhhh... To Bloody Cold !
 

Thymallus 

Banned
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
1,566
Reaction score
0
Location
North Yorkshire
Hive Type
other
Was talking to someone involved in their control should they invade the UK. It's not good reading. If a single colony gets missed they are capable of generating around 100 new queens each seasons.
Also very interesting behavior, unlike the European Hornet that likes a few flying bees daily The Asian Hornets tactics are long term designed to eventually get access and destroy the whole the colony. They have a main nest and then scouts find suitable feeding stations where second "bivouac" nests are established. (in eradicating them the main nest has to be found).

Their initial tactics are to keep the bees confined inside the hive, knocking off the odd one or twenty as they can. It only takes two or three Asian hornets to keep an entire hive confined inside. You can see this on any of the videos where there are bees clustered on the entrances but not flying and foraging and only two or three hornets being deployed in confining the whole hive. Eventually the bees use up their stores as they aren't foraging....weaken and then the invasion by 1000's of them. A veritable feast around mid summer and result is beeless hive.

The difficulty for the beekeeper if they become endemic is that of finding the main nest.....which if you do their tactics are to send a lone hornet out to deter the possible intruder. If this doesn't work then they attack in mass.

The simplest solution is to move your bees to another apairy site away from the hornets bivouac nest site. So migratory beekeepers should be fine. It's the two hives stuck in the back garden where problems can really arise. Particularity as the preferable areas for nesting sites are urban, lightly wooded (tree lined streets). Alternatively you can stand guuard all day knocking them off with a tennis racket....

Apparently the NBU rate them a much more dangerous threat than SHB.
Despite their establishing themselves in France the threat is still light because they haven't reached their full potential yet and are still spreading into virgin territory. It's when they get established and hundreds of nesting sites appear in single areas that the problems really start. i.e when there is competition between the hornets for the available food resources.
It's a pretty frightening thought....I shall think kindly of of our Europen variety knocking off our flying bees in future.
 

Latest posts

Top