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beesrus 

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Hi,
A local timber merchants have suggested I use Ash for my hive components does anyone have any thoughts on this?

I tend to weather proof my hives a dark brown anyway.

Thanks

BeesRus
 

oliver90owner 

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So are they re-inventing the wheel? My thoughts are what is wrong with cedar? What are the supposed advantages of ash? Is this a suggestion or a recommendation? Why are they suggesting ash? Is ash better than cedar? Are you making bee hives or bee cabinets?

RAB
 

Vortex 

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No - whilst it may be good for tool handles due to it's "springyness" it doesn't weather particulalry well and is denser than cedar so the hive would be heavier. This is true of all hardwoods, including chestnut which has some of the best weathering characteristics whilst being reasonably lightweight.
If you can't get or can't afford western red cedar then European White pine is what you should go for - be careful though because the term "white pine" is generic and covers several pine species. Also you need slow grown mountain pine as it's grain structure is much finer and therefore the timber is more durable.
Not that I've done any sort of research in this area myself mind :;
 

Hebeegeebee 

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I don't suppose the bees will mind whatever you use. They even tolerate polystyrene hives for Christs sake :)!
 

Adam 

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Ash is a poor choice - due to it's susceptability to rot outside. Hence why you never see a park bench, or any other outdoor furniture made from it.

As above, if you have some odd desire to use hardwood, either Oak or Chestnut would be better. However softwood is the best way to go - sometimes pine is described as "deal" which can also mean different things at different timber merchants.

Adam
 

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