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Apiguard or Apistan?

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Frithgar 

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A lot of people around here use Apistan, I've not seen anyone near me using apiguard. Personal preferances anyone?
Are there good solid reasons for using one over the other?
Frith
 

Brosville 

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Apistan is a synthetic chemical (Fluvalinate) which is now ineffective over much of the country, thanks to it's over and mis-use - researchers suspect it may possibly be involved in "CCD" in the US (especially when in a cocktail with other oft used agrochemicals) - personally, a ten-foot bargepole job!
"Apiguard" on the other hand is a much more "natural" product, having Thymol as it's active ingredient.......... of the two, infinitely preferable!
 

Frithgar 

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Thanks Bros, I was leaning towards that treatment anyway as it's a newer one so should be less natural resistance, will be placing an order shortly:hurray:
 

jezd 

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Not entirely true, use both if you can be sure your bees have not had Apistan for 3-4years (this is the measurement that is often hard to qualify).

JD
 

Brosville 

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and further increase the varroa mite's immunity to it.....
The logical way is to use the least potentially toxic method available - "blanket bombing" your poor bees is exactly the approach that causes remedies to become ineffective...........
 

jezd 

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Yes and no :) I think if you know your stock and can manage 3-4 year cycles (ie use every 3-4 years) then its appropriate, I am not alone on this one.
 

Hivemaker. 

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Good reason for using one rather than the other......one works...the other does not....mites are resistant to Apistan.
 

jezd 

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MJBee 

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My bees have not had Apistan for a least 10 years. I am going to try it on one colony as a test and compare mite drop with colonies treated as usual with thymol.
 

iHK 

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Yes and no :) I think if you know your stock and can manage 3-4 year cycles (ie use every 3-4 years) then its appropriate, I am not alone on this one.
Agreed. Advice from the manufacturer of both products is that a rotational strategy is best practice. This is most effective at a regional level (i.e. where possible, all beekeepers in an area coordinate to use the same type of treatment at the same time, and all rotate to a new type together after two to three years' consecutive use).

In this way, resistance is unable to build up as mites that are developing resistance to pyrethroid (active ingredient in Apistan and Bayvarol) should be wiped out when the switch is made to Apiguard or an alternative treatment. Note that rotating between Apistan and Bayvarol (same a.i.) is pointless.

To answer the original question, Apistan generally (in the absence of resistance) achieves a higher efficacy (mite kill rate). Apiguard, on the other hand, achieves excellent efficacy but is a more 'holistic' treatment. An organic medicine, Apiguard also protects against tracheal mite and increases the overall health and hygiene of the colony.
 

iHK 

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Good reason for using one rather than the other......one works...the other does not....mites are resistant to Apistan.
I would guess that, since many beekeepers around the original poster are using Apistan, he is fortunate to be based in an area as yet unaffected by pyrethroid resistance.
 

Frithgar 

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I have made some more enquiries with local beeks, most say just chuck in a couple strips and they'll be fine......
I'm guessing that apiguard will be my best option as there seems to be a standard procedure of bombarding mites with apistan.
I don't like to say it as a few of these people have been invaluable with help and advice when I've needed it, but the attitude towards treatment in this area by the larger beekeepers is that it's not really important. If the bees die then they obviously weren't strong enough. Not my preferred method of beekeeping I gotta say, but each to their own.
 

Hivemaker. 

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I have made some more enquiries with local beeks, most say just chuck in a couple strips and they'll be fine......

Good advice.....the mites will love them for it.
Problem with the pyrethroid treatments is it is already in the wax...and from nature...so will remain ineffective.
 
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