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Any way to tell whether honey has been pasturized

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Sidney 

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I have a jar of Black Locust honey and I'm wondering if there's any way to tell whether it has been pasturized.

Seeing how honey that has been pasturized doesn't crystalize, is there some way to induce crystalization so that I can test it that way?
 
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Pasteurisation only delays crystalisation. The process done properly doesn't really harm the honey. It may increase the HMF level but HMF is not poisonous to humans anyway and if it is on sale you can probably safely assume the levels are below the legal limit.
 

oliver90owner 

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so that I can test it that way?

Not sure what you are wanting here. why would you want to test it that way? You could well get an unrelated result to your original hypotheseis.

Simple solution would be to ferment it - well try to. Pasteurised - no go; unpasteurised - it will ferment. Simple? Or am I missing something?

RAB
 

Sidney 

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so that I can test it that way?

Not sure what you are wanting here. why would you want to test it that way? You could well get an unrelated result to your original hypotheseis.

Simple solution would be to ferment it - well try to. Pasteurised - no go; unpasteurised - it will ferment. Simple? Or am I missing something?

RAB
I see, thanks!

Can you tell me, please, how do I get it to ferment, and how do I tell it has fermented?
 

victor meldrew 

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I see, thanks!

Can you tell me, please, how do I get it to ferment, and how do I tell it has fermented?
Mix some of it with cooled boiled water in a sterile container (bottle), stick some sterile cotton wool in the neck and place in a warm place .
After a few days , the mixture will start to froth as any yeasts in there with have started to convert the sugars into alcohol and C02 !!.

John Wilkinson
 

Sidney 

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Mix some of it with cooled boiled water in a sterile container (bottle), stick some sterile cotton wool in the neck and place in a warm place .
After a few days , the mixture will start to froth as any yeasts in there with have started to convert the sugars into alcohol and C02 !!.

John Wilkinson
Thanks a lot!

Just to be sure (English is my second language), by froth you mean bubbles will begin to form?
 

victor meldrew 

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Yes , as the Co2 rises to the surface

John Wilkinson

PS English is my second language,
Wiganeze is my first :D
 

Sidney 

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Yes , as the Co2 rises to the surface

John Wilkinson

PS English is my second language,
Wiganeze is my first :D
How long will the bubbles be there with say a tablespoon's worth of honey? I'm worried all the bubbles might go over night.
 

oliver90owner 

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If you were that worried, you could sit up all night watching! It may take a while for it to start fermenting dependent on temperature, the amounts and types of yeasts in the honey (all assuming they have not been killed off). It will ferment into a mead, which like any wine or beer, will ferment until the yeasts have used up all the sugars or until they sozzle themselves in alcohol. Some wines ferment for weeks on end. Froth is caused by bubbles but will not usually burst like a single bubble and disappear quickly. You would not miss the activity, if you checked it daily (and probably not, if checked weekly!).

Regards, RAB
 

Sidney 

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If you were that worried, you could sit up all night watching! It may take a while for it to start fermenting dependent on temperature, the amounts and types of yeasts in the honey (all assuming they have not been killed off). It will ferment into a mead, which like any wine or beer, will ferment until the yeasts have used up all the sugars or until they sozzle themselves in alcohol. Some wines ferment for weeks on end. Froth is caused by bubbles but will not usually burst like a single bubble and disappear quickly. You would not miss the activity, if you checked it daily (and probably not, if checked weekly!).

Regards, RAB
Great, thanks!
 

Sidney 

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Well, I got a few bubbles floating on the surface, but it's not like in a fizzy drink where they float to the surface and pop. These just stay there. Also a whole bunch of small green lumps that look like tiny pieces of gause rolled up into balls have appeared, floating on the surface.

I guess that's it, right?
 

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