Quantcast

Any one using the Happykeeper varroa floor

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Grub 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 30, 2009
Messages
238
Reaction score
0
Location
Pencoed
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3 14x12
Hi all
Just having a nose about on Google about Varroa and found the link to Happykeeper varroa floors made out of platsic tubes and have now found out that Thornes stock them. Whats your thought or have you got them already ?

Grub
 

andypigeon 

House Bee
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
140
Reaction score
0
Location
Derby
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
6
I have heard mixed things about them, i think they was a problem with the tubes moveing in some but i could be wrong
 

ian 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
348
Reaction score
0
Location
uk
Hive Type
none
Hi

Same result as a mesh floor but twice the price...........


Regards Ian
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
26
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
Frames should be spaced appropriately, as well. So not (in bulk) for those that might wish to change frame spacing.

Regards, RAB
 

Grub 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 30, 2009
Messages
238
Reaction score
0
Location
Pencoed
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3 14x12
.
It does work but it gives hope.
Neither work the mesh floor with varroa.
Sorry Finman but I dont understand" Neither work the mesh floor with Varroa"

Grub
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,522
Reaction score
24
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
Frames should be spaced appropriately, as well. So not (in bulk) for those that might wish to change frame spacing.

Regards, RAB
here is my home made 11 frames one for 37mm spacing , the Thornes ones require 12 frames at hoffmann spacing ( or 11 plus dummy)

even with the thornes one that i have seen used the frames are never directly over the centres because of proplis, brace comb etc

Do they work....well I have just bought a new floor with stainless steel mess floor from Tom Bick...does that answer the question!!!!

even with slippery food grade pipe, i found the wax detritus trapped the varroa on top of the tubes and they a FXXXing evil to clean
 

Grub 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 30, 2009
Messages
238
Reaction score
0
Location
Pencoed
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3 14x12
here is my home made 11 frames one for 37mm spacing , the Thornes ones require 12 frames at hoffmann spacing ( or 11 plus dummy)

even with the thornes one that i have seen used the frames are never directly over the centres because of proplis, brace comb etc

Do they work....well I have just bought a new floor with stainless steel mess floor from Tom Bick...does that answer the question!!!!

even with slippery food grade pipe, i found the wax detritus trapped the varroa on top of the tubes and they a FXXXing evil to clean
Looks good I bet the bees love log rollingbee-smillie
Thats what I like about the forum just plain talking

thanks again
Grub
 

ian 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
348
Reaction score
0
Location
uk
Hive Type
none
Hi

Can I get the blow torch out to clean it...............................:coolgleamA:
 

MuswellMetro 

Queen Bee
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
6,522
Reaction score
24
Location
London N10
Hive Type
14x12
Hi

Can I get the blow torch out to clean it...............................:coolgleamA:

I use the blow torch made by Omlet for the Beehaus on my happy beekeeper floor , its about £150 and is made of pink plastic...and it looks great
 

Bird-dog 

New Bee
Joined
Jun 1, 2010
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
Happykeeper floors

I've used Happykeeper floors for five years, and wouldn't go back to anything else. Yes, they're more expensive but well worth it. A thriving colony will keep them as clean as a whistle, and if a colony isn't thriving, it won't be because of the floors. Winter condensation now a thing of the past, and the bees seem to tolerate the cold very well, even last winter.
 

Gardenbees 

Field Bee
Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
568
Reaction score
0
Location
Gloucestershire
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3
Hi, not sure if this will add to the original query or not, but I too have a home-made version of the Happykeeper floor. It's a fairly recent introduction but so far, so good:

This spring I used up some nice, clean timber which I've had lying around for a while and made a 4ft "trough hive" (takes BS frames, or top bars if I'm feeling radical). The cost of 4ft of stainless steel mesh for the base, and the vulnerability of using that much plastic mesh, made me look around for alternatives. In the end I created a quick, cheap, home-made version of the Happykeeper floor. It consists of frame-width plastic tubing, about 2.5mm apart, not mounted flush with the floor but simply hung on nails so that the edges don't quite meet the sides of the trough. Not enough gap to let much through (and certainly not bees), but it has a couple of advantages. Firstly, any mites that tightrope walk their way along the top of a tube can't actually get back up the sides of the box, because the hanging tubes don't quite meet the sides. Secondly, I can de-crud the tubes quietly and quickly by gently rolling them (they are loose enough to roll out slightly bigger bits of wax etc. without disturbing the bees). Any stuck bits of propolis or wax or whatever are easily dislodged, or can be cleaned off from below. The fact that the tubes don't let much light through seems to make the bees ignore what's going on, as if it was a branch moving or some other minor event.

This, for me, is an improvement on mesh which tends to bung up with bits despite the efforts of the bees to keep it clean, and requires a bit of maneovering if you want to clean it. My propolis-loving, prolific Buckfast crew also seem to delight in glueing up their mesh whenever possible, somewhat negating the purpose...

As it turns out, like Bird-dog, I find the bees tend to keep the tubes very clean, so I don't really have to move them after all. The hanging tubes do have another (possible) use though: I was worried about moths possibly squeezing in between, but the slight movement of the tubes and the steep upward climb to get in (and easy defence from above...) seems to have deterred any gatecrashers.

If I want to look at mite-drop, there's a slide-in floor underneath, which accumulates rows of bits from between the tubes (and, in theory, mites, although we haven't been bothered with them recently), so the fall-through process works. It was very cheap and quick to create, and I'm happy with it so far.

Whilst the Happykeeper hype about ventilation, and better insulation than wire mesh, is likely true, I wouldn't get hung up about the "eliminates varroa" claims, which are clearly cobblers. The best one can hope for from an open type floor, IMHO, is a clear indication of mite drop either from month to month, or following treatment. Still, the tubes are OK for me for the time being, and the bees have accepted them without problems. If you're in the mood for some simple home-made solutions to housing bees, then so far I can recommend it.

Anyway, I've hedged my options - the whole tube floor thing can be removed easily and replaced with mesh if I change my mind!

GB
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
26
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
Bird-dog

For 4 quid (or less), plus a few strips of planed timber and a few screws, I can knock up an OMF in not too long.

For 40 quid, I can buy one of these? No contest, I am afraid. Easy to carry spares and change a floor.

I have looked at them but thought better of it. Perhaps if I find time and inspiration (and some suitable materials), the lathe and milling machines might get some use to knock one or two up for a trial. Best might be one of the Dartingtons as those floors are not easily removable, but then there is the problem with positioning dividers more precisely......

Cold is not a problem for bees, as long as they are dry. Is bottom ventilation adequate on it's own with these floors? I don't leave any top ventilation and certainly get no condensation with OMFs.

Regards, RAB
 

tonybloke 

Queen Bee
Joined
Mar 4, 2009
Messages
3,480
Reaction score
0
Location
Gorleston-on-sea, Norfolk
Hive Type
commercial
Number of Hives
3 Commercial hives with National supers, Top Bee Space. + 2 Nucs
Hi, not sure if this will add to the original query or not, but I too have a home-made version of the Happykeeper floor. It's a fairly recent introduction but so far, so good:

This spring I used up some nice, clean timber which I've had lying around for a while and made a 4ft "trough hive" (takes BS frames, or top bars if I'm feeling radical). The cost of 4ft of stainless steel mesh for the base, and the vulnerability of using that much plastic mesh, made me look around for alternatives. In the end I created a quick, cheap, home-made version of the Happykeeper floor. It consists of frame-width plastic tubing, about 2.5mm apart, not mounted flush with the floor but simply hung on nails so that the edges don't quite meet the sides of the trough. Not enough gap to let much through (and certainly not bees), but it has a couple of advantages. Firstly, any mites that tightrope walk their way along the top of a tube can't actually get back up the sides of the box, because the hanging tubes don't quite meet the sides. Secondly, I can de-crud the tubes quietly and quickly by gently rolling them (they are loose enough to roll out slightly bigger bits of wax etc. without disturbing the bees). Any stuck bits of propolis or wax or whatever are easily dislodged, or can be cleaned off from below. The fact that the tubes don't let much light through seems to make the bees ignore what's going on, as if it was a branch moving or some other minor event.

This, for me, is an improvement on mesh which tends to bung up with bits despite the efforts of the bees to keep it clean, and requires a bit of maneovering if you want to clean it. My propolis-loving, prolific Buckfast crew also seem to delight in glueing up their mesh whenever possible, somewhat negating the purpose...

As it turns out, like Bird-dog, I find the bees tend to keep the tubes very clean, so I don't really have to move them after all. The hanging tubes do have another (possible) use though: I was worried about moths possibly squeezing in between, but the slight movement of the tubes and the steep upward climb to get in (and easy defence from above...) seems to have deterred any gatecrashers.

If I want to look at mite-drop, there's a slide-in floor underneath, which accumulates rows of bits from between the tubes (and, in theory, mites, although we haven't been bothered with them recently), so the fall-through process works. It was very cheap and quick to create, and I'm happy with it so far.

Whilst the Happykeeper hype about ventilation, and better insulation than wire mesh, is likely true, I wouldn't get hung up about the "eliminates varroa" claims, which are clearly cobblers. The best one can hope for from an open type floor, IMHO, is a clear indication of mite drop either from month to month, or following treatment. Still, the tubes are OK for me for the time being, and the bees have accepted them without problems. If you're in the mood for some simple home-made solutions to housing bees, then so far I can recommend it.

Anyway, I've hedged my options - the whole tube floor thing can be removed easily and replaced with mesh if I change my mind!

GB
Any chance of some photo's? this sounds like a 'project' for my mates TBH.
 

Gardenbees 

Field Bee
Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
568
Reaction score
0
Location
Gloucestershire
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3
Oooh - possibly. If the weather's OK I'm actually having a look inside that hive tomorrow so will try to get pics. I'll see what I can do. Don't get too excited: I can't pretend it's rocket science!

GB
 

Gardenbees 

Field Bee
Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
568
Reaction score
0
Location
Gloucestershire
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
3
Home made Happykeeper style floor

I've posted a short album of hive pictures including a couple of shots of the floor. Hope it's of interest. Pics were taken today (June 19th).
http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/album.php?albumid=104

NB. There's runners for sliding a varroa-checking board under the tubes, which I didn't get a picture of this time. I put greased paper on the board each time. The tubes leave clear lines of bits, neatly showing which frame the bits have come off. No mites so far, but doubtless they're in there somewhere.
 

kingbeemargate 

New Bee
Joined
Dec 7, 2010
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Margate
Hive Type
none
Happykeeper Floors

I've had them on 10 hives starting 3 years ago. They are brilliant.
I had one colony loss last winter that was on a standard floor.
There was no varoa seen this year and have have used sugar dusting for controls - no chemicals.
 

Rosti 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Reaction score
0
Location
North Yorks, UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4
I am clearly having a senior moment here,

  • I'm on OMFs,
  • I can change frame spacing without changing floors,
  • I can be ham fisted putting frames back with unintentional poor frame alignment but the varroa still drop through.
  • I am tempted by the opportunity to purchase a pink omlet blow torch, but am controlling the urge.

Where is the advantage over a std mesh OMF?

Can someone spell this one out for me please, because I'm missing the USP!
 

Skyhook 

Queen Bee
Joined
May 19, 2010
Messages
3,054
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
5
I've posted a short album of hive pictures including a couple of shots of the floor. Hope it's of interest. Pics were taken today (June 19th).
http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/album.php?albumid=104

NB. There's runners for sliding a varroa-checking board under the tubes, which I didn't get a picture of this time. I put greased paper on the board each time. The tubes leave clear lines of bits, neatly showing which frame the bits have come off. No mites so far, but doubtless they're in there somewhere.
Nice looking hive! I'm still not convinced by the floor, but I'm sure I could find a spot for a hive like that!
 

Poly Hive 

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
13,655
Reaction score
2
Location
Scottish Borders
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
9 and 18 Nucs
I can't say I am convinced either but I can see a way of making it pretty cheaply using dowel and poly water pipe.



PH
 

Latest posts

Top