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jenkinsbrynmair 

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Just reading a study on beekeeping and a developmental roadmap for Tanzania and one paragraph caught my eye. And we think we have it hard!

"Halfan Athuman Mezera is a member of JUHUDI beekeepers group at Ntanzansona village in Rufiji. Halfan is disabled"...............





"as he lost the use of his right hand and lost his right leg in a crocodile attack when he was crossing the Rufiji River to take care of his hives".
 
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Just reading a study on beekeeping and a developmental roadmap for Tanzania and one paragraph caught my eye. And we think we have it hard!

"Halfan Athuman Mezera is a member of JUHUDI beekeepers group at Ntanzansona village in Rufiji. Halfan is disabled"...............


"as he lost the use of his right hand and lost his right leg in a crocodile attack when he was crossing the Rufiji River to take care of his hives".
I haven't had a problem with crocodiles in my garden since I put up this sign:

1599673151183.png
 

Antipodes 

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That's shocking Jenkins. I recently came across a story of another beekeeper in New Zealand who is doing incredible things too.... Blinded in two separate accidents at 19 and then took up beekeeping. This is a link to a news story on him.

 
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This could quite easily turn into the four Yorkshire men sketch;)
Eh lad ... there wuz a bloke I knew at home in Yorkshire - he lost both his legs after an accident skiing down a slag heap and then took up hangliding and collided with a Sheffield tram that took both his arms off ... he took up beekeeping and does all his inspections just using his mouth ....
 

understanding_bees 

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Eh lad ... there wuz a bloke I knew at home in Yorkshire - he lost both his legs after an accident skiing down a slag heap and then took up hangliding and collided with a Sheffield tram that took both his arms off ... he took up beekeeping and does all his inspections just using his mouth ....
Did you hear about the man standing at the bus-stop, waiting for the bus to arrive?

He had three heads, no arms, and only one leg!

When the bus arrived, the bus driver said, " 'Ullo, 'Ullo, 'Ullo, you look 'armless, 'op on "
 

Antipodes 

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"I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet"
 

ericbeaumont 

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how about the numbers of colonies estimated that one can look after
In the Eastern States, where the weather during the summer may interfere with the work of the bee keeper, a skilled man may care for perhaps 600 colonies. In the West, however, where the weather does not so greatly enter into the beekeeper's calculations, this number may be increased to 1,000.

Not alone, surely? Mind you, in those days travel may have been quicker despite slower vehicles, and strong forage justified 100 in an apiary, which in turn would mean the apiaries would be reasonably local. Even so...
 

Antipodes 

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In the Eastern States, where the weather during the summer may interfere with the work of the bee keeper, a skilled man may care for perhaps 600 colonies. In the West, however, where the weather does not so greatly enter into the beekeeper's calculations, this number may be increased to 1,000.

Not alone, surely? Mind you, in those days travel may have been quicker despite slower vehicles, and strong forage justified 100 in an apiary, which in turn would mean the apiaries would be reasonably local. Even so...
Well, the way it reads, apparently yes...alone. "A skilled man", singular. I've heard it said recently, that a person here could manage 500 colonies, but would be very busy. That's with many diseases but not varroa or small hive beetle. I guess a hundred years ago there was no varroa there, small hive beetle, and probably a multitude of other bee diseases either. It would have been extra tough for those blokes on page 9 hey?
 

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