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Skyhook 

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And see the pepperpot appearance, decaying brood, discoloured cappings and at least one cell with chalk brood,
I'm glad you said that- I was thinking it didn't look great. What's up with the grub at 45 deg in it's cell, creamy looking, dead centre- is that EFB?
 

kazmcc 

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I was in touch with the guy who posted it. He sent me a message saying he hoped my bees looked nothing like these lol. Great pic isn't it. Covers most things to look out for clearly.
 

psafloyd 

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I'm glad you said that- I was thinking it didn't look great. What's up with the grub at 45 deg in it's cell, creamy looking, dead centre- is that EFB?
I was wondering about whether that was something like early EFB or chalk brood?
 

kazmcc 

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the text at the bottom says

At a quarantined bee yard, Pennsylvania State University entomologist Dennis vanEngelsdorp studies colony collapse disorder and the bee diseases thought to cause it.

This panorama of a struggling comb reveals dangers such as Chalkbrood fungus, Sacbrood virus infections. and even invading bees. Also seen are bees in various stages of development, glistening pots of nectar and stashes of yellow “bee bread,” the wads of protein-packed pollen that bees eat for food.

But for some reason I remember discussing EFB with this dude.
 

wilderness 

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maybe Bcrazy could annotate it for us new beeks so we can understand what we are looking at :seeya::seeya:
 

kazmcc 

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There is one with pointers. I'll try and find it and post. It's the same frame.

http://www.gigapan.org/gigapans/27538/

Scroll down and there are close ups with descriptions underneath. Helps to identify what you're looking at. Hope that helps
 
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Hombre 

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Excellent Kaz. An excellent resource, just made better. Thanks.

And a big thank you to Paul for finding it originally. of course.
 

Scutellator 

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Wow. Its like bee disease encyclopedia

Firstly I thought its carniolan brood during the early spring. Then I took a closer look - Sac brood, Chalk brood,Nosema, and who know else
 

psafloyd 

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Would one of our resident experts mind giving us a rundown of the various nasties.

I can tell the difference between eggs, larvae and I think the healthy ones and then pollen and nectar.

The top left corner is a mess with the cappings looking like they've had chocolate dripped on them. Is this the sacbrood and the larvae in between like husks, chalkbrood? Same in bottom portion.

There is one cell (13 down from top left and 17 across) that looks like a coprolite.
 

Hombre 

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There is one with pointers. I'll try and find it and post. It's the same frame.

http://www.gigapan.org/gigapans/27538/

Scroll down and there are close ups with descriptions underneath. Helps to identify what you're looking at. Hope that helps
Kaz has already given an alternative link and adequately explained what to do. Some imagination and a modicum of self help is actually obligatory.

See my picture below for more. Use the red arrow to scroll the sub-pictures horizontally and click on the selected picture to get the description (in the panel on the right) of the feature selected (which will be framed in red) and in the main picture panel which will automatically zoom in.

If indeed BCrazy were to spend a lot of time annotating and explaining as was asked by an earlier poster, is there any guarantee that his efforts wouldn't be squandered by a minority requiring instant gratification.

No names, no pack-drills, if the cap fits, swallow and move swiftly on without further comment.

Meanwhile - back to the thread . . . (thanks again Kaz, it's an uphill struggle sometimes_.

With the deepest respect,

Edit: in the picture the highlighted (red) frame is not the subject of the description, but the picture to the right. This is presumably an artifact/interaction of the screen grabbing.
 
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psafloyd 

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Kaz has already given an alternative link and adequately explained what to do. Some imagination and a modicum of self help is actually obligatory.

If indeed BCrazy were to spend a lot of time annotating and explaining as was asked by an earlier poster, is there any guarantee that his efforts wouldn't be squandered by a minority requiring instant gratification.
Given I asked for the input, Hombre, I'll assume you are directing that at me.

I am far from requiring instant gratification. Do you think I would have looked to beekeeping to satisfy that impulse if I did?

I am more than happy to research stuff at length (goes with the day job) and have scoured many dozens if not hundreds of the threads since I joined. I'd read most of the five beekeeping books I had bought before I started my course, but nothing makes up for practical experience.

I thought it would be useful to have a walk through by somoene who knows. Not only for myself, but others. I am quite used to asking the questions others want to ask but are afraid to look stupid. Again, it goes with the job.

I hadn't seen Kaz's post, though I thought I had read all the thread or else it might not have occurred to me to post as I did.

I've no problem with smartarse and I can look after myself, but we've just broken the 4,000 member barrier and thinly-veiled barbed comments are the kinds of things make people walk and I thought this forum prided itslef in not having an attitude I would associate with certain national institutions.

Back to the study now. I really must look up Kaz's post.

:rant:
 

kazmcc 

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It doesn't tell you what those dark grey cappings are though. They don't look good to me, but I may be wrong.
 

Skyhook 

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The picture is fantastic, but I did find some of the captions a bit less than clear. Try cross-referencing with Fera leaflets (available as PDF on beebase)- where the descritptions are brilliant but the pictures slightly less clear, IMHO
 

Ruary 

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Wow. Its like bee disease encyclopedia

Firstly I thought its carniolan brood during the early spring. Then I took a closer look - Sac brood, Chalk brood,Nosema, and who know else
So tell me how you can tell nosema from the picture???
 

Scutellator 

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When you see a bee like this one, you can normally expect the presence of nosema
 

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