An Inspector calls ....

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Rosti 

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Been posted by others on numerous occassions I know but to reassure those who may be unconvinced of the merrit of inspections. Had mine today, the inspector was great, useful hive observations, info on local activity and forage (my forage dip early august was affecting a good proportion of the vale of york), confirmation that all is well.

One thing I still can't get my head round. How can 4 queens play 'hard to get' Mrs Invisible all year and when the Insp arrives they all strut their stuff in the middle of a frame, blowing him kisses and generally being tarts?
 

Onge 

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Been posted by others on numerous occassions I know but to reassure those who may be unconvinced of the merrit of inspections. Had mine today, the inspector was great, useful hive observations, info on local activity and forage (my forage dip early august was affecting a good proportion of the vale of york), confirmation that all is well.

One thing I still can't get my head round. How can 4 queens play 'hard to get' Mrs Invisible all year and when the Insp arrives they all strut their stuff in the middle of a frame, blowing him kisses and generally being tarts?
Lol that made me laugh.
 

BeeNice 

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I had the same with finding the queen on a swarm I collected early in the year, had loads of look ins, and nothing, soon as a friend came to have a look and a second opion there she was! Bit like if you take your car to a garage with a problem, fixed as soon as the engineer arrives. With the queen I am now alot better a finding her, see her now on almost every inspection, I think its called getting your eye in. Well done for doing so well.
regard
S
 

darren64 

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do inspectors just call at random,or does there have to be a problem in the immediate area?
 

wilderness 

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My experience suggests they usually have a reason to ask to see your colonies. My 2 visits have been due to AFB in the area.
 

Polyanwood 

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They also come if you ask them to.
 

VEG 

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They tend to visit most new beeks and will visit if you ask them to.
 

oliver90owner 

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3 scenarios.

They want to, in regards of a local disease outbreak.
You ask them.
Routine checks of all known keepers - visits may be very seldom or more regular.

Regards, RAB
 

Moggs 

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Yep. SBI told me that they try to get around as many new beekeepers as possible. No bad thing as far as I can see. Nip any bad habits in the bud and a wealth of experience into the bargain.
 

darren64 

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the problem is though,if new beeks don't join an association the inspector doesn't now they exist,therefore if there is an outbreak of disease in the area it cannot be fully monitored.
 

oliver90owner 

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It didn't make so much odds in the dim and distant past. Loads of feral colonies, not too much disease and very few new, untrained beeks.

Yes, that particular category are a risk/threat to honey bee health.

The one thing going for them is that they likely have just the one apiary site.

Regards, RAB
 

Moggs 

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I would venture that anybody starting in beekeeping without an adequate support and monitoring network is behaving irresponsibly. There is no doubt that bees have been going through a bad time but I wonder whether the upsurge in interest is really that good for the long run. There can be little doubt that recent campaigns and publicity have brought the bee into the limelight and many a back garden. I could perhaps lose sleep wondering if all of these new keepers would be able to recognise AFB/ EFB so that it can be dealt with promptly.

AFB and EFB as we know are statutorily notifiable. I would imagine that the vast majority of beekeepers would be able to comply. The weakness is perhaps that there is nothing to stop any Tom, Dick or Harriet getting themselves a beehive or three, without anybody knowing (apart from maybe some aggrieved neighbours) and then for them to inflict untold misery on their charges and possibly threaten otherwise healthy colonies within foraging distance.

Am I correct in thinking that the last season or two have seen an unprecedented increase of new recruits, good bad and indifferent? If that is the case, the impact of 'good' new beekeeping may not be noticed but is it only a matter of time before we learn the impact of 'bad' practice on an exponential scale?

Despite the rather gloomy tone of all of this, I do believe that there is a strong element of self-policing within beekeeping circles and that sooner or later most beekeepers will recognise the benefits of the synergy throughout association and resources such as this forum.

Contentious subject matter - and I've been wrong before. And yes, I am still a new beekeeper!
 
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thurrock bees 

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i asked him to visit last year, but this year him asked to come to me as there was TWO EFB outbreaks near me.Got a clean record tho. :)
 

Rosti 

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Just to pick up on the reason for the inspector calling and frequency of calls - I asked the same of the inspector (why had he requested an inspection).

The request to inspect was because I had only registered on beebase this year, so an unknown / unvisited site from their perspective.

In terms of frequency he said they aim to visit all known apiaries every 3 years routinely; or, if there is a disease outbreak local to that site; or, and as stated previously in the thread, if the beek requests it (which then depends on work load).

On that final point he told me of a few interesting requests to inspect. One that his boss had was from a new beek who requested an inspection every 2 weeks and asked if she could block book them, when the inspector jokingly asked if she would like him to come and extract the honey as well she said 'oh thank you that would be lovely, can you bring your own extractor please'
 

kermit 

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We had an inspection earlier this year. We registered on beebase last year when we got our first colony. Sandra organised her visit for the end of her day. This meant she gave us a really good visit - went through both colonies, answered lots of questions we had and then ate our cake and drank tea :drool5:. Also helped by the fact that she is a member of our local assoc.

I thought it was very useful visit as we got a clean bill of health and lots of practical advice. If you get a call don't panic, it should be a relaxed visit if ours was anything to go by.

On the question of new beeks being a problem... I know what people are saying, but it depends on if they are 'playing' or serious. Some will get involved as part of an eco trip. For others they will get all the advice possible, attend their local assoc meetings and really try to do the best for their bees. However, the problem could more be that old hands are not prepared to support these new beeks. Rather than whinge, go out and mentor. That way things are done right. In this respect I must say that this forum is better than another I could mention...

Cheers
Dave
 

oliver90owner 

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New beeks are, in the main, not a problem. Let there be many of them.

The new beeks referred to were specifically the type that don't join a beekeeping body, as in post #10 quote: "if new beeks don't join an association the inspector doesn't now they exist".

They might all be serious, but those who attempt to go it alone, without a great deal of serious reading, are the ones who may be the highest risk.

I can think of a few that have given that impression. Not many, but a few.

RAB
 

Michael 365 

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Dear All,

Darren 64 remarked that'if you don't join an association, they (the inspectors) don't know you exist' or words to that effect.

My understanding is that the way to bring yourself to the inspectors attention is to register on Beebase; they will then know you are out there. If there is a local outbreak of something bad, then this is the best insurance (registering with Beebase).

They also, of course, get info from local associations...both the regional bee inspector, and one of the seasonal bee inspectors are both regular attendes at our local association.

Regards, Michael
 

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