Quantcast

A bit of good news for a change

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Onge 

Field Bee
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
839
Reaction score
0
Location
Cambridge
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
9 Medium Poly, mostly foundation-less. Some run as Warre TBH
Hi all

Just letting you know, I used the sulphur candle method for my drawn comb this year.

With the suppers wet from extraction.

I had to move one of my stacks of frames toady and had to take the stack apart.

Looked through the frames and they are perfect and still smell sweet.

So thats thumbs up for sulphur so far :party:
 

grizzly 

Drone Bee
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
1,106
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
6
I used the sulphur strips last year, they seemed to do the trick, this year i have relied upon the temperatures to keep out the nasties.
 

Hombre 

Queen Bee
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
2,818
Reaction score
1
Location
West Midlands
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
Ten
Could we fall prey as the weather warms up before the middle of March say or do the waxmoth not breed until later?
 

Somerford 

Drone Bee
Joined
Aug 24, 2009
Messages
1,579
Reaction score
13
Location
Wiltshire, Somerset, S Glos & S Oxfordshire
Hive Type
national
I'd be interested to learn more about the lifecycle of the wax moth etc.

Could I simply leave an 'Insect-o-cutor' on over the winter intead ?
when do they start becoming active ?

is there a way of baiting a trap to prevent them ?
regards

S
 

plumber 

House Bee
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
262
Reaction score
1
Location
LEICESTER
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
7
Bcrazy

can you recommend a good book for a novice with a new basic microscope suitable for the bee keeper.

regards
mik
 

grizzly 

Drone Bee
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
1,106
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
6
Good Link Bcrazy, theres an awful lot of info on that website.

Personally i am more concerned about the hives than the stored supers, particularly around the time of the first full inspection, while exciting there is an element of concern over what might be discovered, has anything taken advantage of the clusters warmth, and also of the bees lack of policing and movement around the frames.

Hopefully the extreme cold this year has done some good on the inside too.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
27
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
Onge,

You probably started on an 'up' with wet supers.

The weather has been on our side so far since before Christmas

Mine were dry but and have only been candled once. I will be doing them again shortly.

It is not expensive to treat - one super is worth a tenner for foundation without the hassle of fitting it and the bees having to draw the comb. I am not talking of 10 or 11 frames in this context, of course!

Regards, RAB
 

Bcrazy 

Drone Bee
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
1,491
Reaction score
5
Location
Warboys, CAMBS
Hive Type
none
Number of Hives
nil bees given away all colonies
Hi plumber,

Welcome to the world of microscopy, you will find it fascinating.

To answer your question I need to know what type of microscope you have and what you would like to pursue using the microscope?

Is it pollen. anatomy or dissections you would like to carry out?
Give me a little more info and I'll get back to you.

Regards;
 

The Hyde Ranger 

House Bee
Joined
Dec 12, 2009
Messages
150
Reaction score
0
Location
Swansea, South Wales.
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4
I'd be interested to learn more about the lifecycle of the wax moth etc.

Could I simply leave an 'Insect-o-cutor' on over the winter intead ?
when do they start becoming active ?

is there a way of baiting a trap to prevent them ?
regards

S
There is simple a trap for wax moths on dave cushman's site also,and is made using a 2L plastic pop bottle, You make a 30mm diameter hole in the side of the bottle just under the shoulder and fill it with 1 cup of white vinegar, 1 cup of sugar (any type), 1 banana peel, and top up with water to about 75% of the volume, tie a loop of cord around the neck and hang near by in the apiary if the hanging loop is opposite the hole it should prevent the ingress of rain water, presumably the moths are attracted to it and drown. It's something I found whilst surfing and have not tried this out, I have not yet got any bees, I will be trying it out when I get some.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
27
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
Could I simply leave an 'Insect-o-cutor' on
There is simple a trap for wax moths

The unfortunate thing is that one waxmoth can lay enough eggs to destroy a lot of comb. The larvae unfortunately don't fly and it's too late to trap the moth after it has left enough eggs to do the damage (or has just hatched from the box you carefully stored away last autumn).

Yes, trap them - but don't rely on it!!

Regards, RAB
 

Latest posts

Top