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14x12 frame

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sahtlinurk 

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hi,

if glued and nailed will it last? the width of the frame is 35mm. just a prototype. No need for comments " why not just go and buy ..... "

Lauri
 

oliver90owner 

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I would think they would get seriously propolised together --- and not last.

Well, might last but no good for frame removal.

14 x 12 side bars are available separately. Or make the complete side bar from a single piece of wood. Convert the DN1 sidebars for super frames if they must be used.

Regards, RAB
 

hedgerow pete 

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I like the idea of what you have tried to do , most commendable , personaly i dont like the side bar arrangements but thats just me, I looked into making my own frames from scratch but never bothered its a closed shop and no one would allow me to how they are made and in what order the saw cuts where, also the price of timber does not work out in my favour, unless I was to buy it straight of the boat at bristol and evan then it was only just posible for me to make any profit. I evam looked into setting up a small work shop to manafacture them but the profit margins were way to low to consider it, All I do now it buy them from poland and go away for a long weekend and come back with them in the caravan
 
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Tom Bick 

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Sorry Lauri the same as rab they will get propolised together and the extensions you have made are plywood although strong in sheet form in short strips like that quite brittle.
I have myself considered making frames on a number of occasions and I think I will one day but every time I look at it it has to be a 1000 min and I dont need all of them and then you think of all the individual actions and the repetitiveness of it all and finally the better things you can do with your time so I click the mouse and have them delivered.

HP When I am stuck with something to make and not clear on how to make it I think that I will use the tools I have to hand and the knowledge I have as present to make the item and as long as it is the same at the end its worked. It may take a bit longer but it will always be quicker next time.
 
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Tom Bick 

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Hi Lauri

Have given this a bit of thought whilst walking the dog try fitting the extension strips on the inside of the side bars retaining the groove for the wax I think they can be a bit wider than the side bars for extra strength and you will have to sacrifice a bit of frame size but it might work.
 

oliver90owner 

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Tom/Lauri,

IF I was going to do it (extend standard to jumbo), I would mortice all the side bars, cut across the centre line of the mortice and fit in a tenoned extension piece, so basically morticed and tenoned, but like you say perhaps a batten glued on (either side of the foundation slot) to give extra support. But proper fitting joints and appropriate wood glue may well be adequate. A job for the spindle moulder and morticer, rather than done by hand tools, so easier to manufacture new bars from scratch!

Regards, RAB
 
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Tom Bick 

Guest
You are quite right Rab or just make extension side bar pieces that fit into the two slots reserved for the bottom bars but we obviously have the toys to play with I was giving advice on Lauri's firs attempt in the photo and basing advice on that kitchen table and over sized hammer approach no disrespect Lauri
 

MuswellMetro 

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I ve seen similar type of extended brood frame by putting the 6mm ply on the wax side of the side bars rather than the edge, ie the foundation that is usable is 6+6=12 less

this gives support to the wax in the void area in your bar, and you get less propilis as bee space is maintained between frames

whether it will last a wax change and soda scrub, you would have to see
 

oliver90owner 

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side bar pieces that fit into the two slots reserved for the bottom bars

Too simple. Why did I miss that? Too much of a rush.

I would still start from scatch! Advantages of one piece of wood are more than significant. Just as much work and still have the originals intact for use elsewhere.

BTW Lauri, they usually use the wider top bars for 14 x 12s. Just all round a better option.

Regards, RAB
 

johna 

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If you've got an accurate table saw ,frames are dead easy to make.Not one at a time but in batches of say 100 or so .You just need to plan each stage then repeat each stage over the whole batch .This way it reduces setting up.Top bars have most operations.Side bars are made as a slab then sliced off like slices of bread when the top and bottom grooving is completed,then the face grooving for the wax location is thier last operation.Hoffman side bars are a little more complicated but are still made on the saw.Thornes have batch produced their frames on a succession of small saws for years.Bit like fly fishing realy-full of bull---t and mystique but dead simple if you stop and think about it.The wood used is very cheap and softwood offcuts can be used, most joinery firms are pleased to give the stuff away or charge firewood prices.
 

johna 

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thats it tho , if i was to buy a decent table saw plus blades and other tools and what ever else is needed, it starts to get past the point of being economical, and easier to buy them from europe
I bought my saw on ebay,cost 30 quid,needed a bit of t.l.c but I ended up with a dead accurate m/c.As I make all my own equipment (cedar hives etc etc) the investment in the saw has been repaid a few times over.
 

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